Read Along Came Dylan: Two'S a Crowd When You'Ve Been Top Dog by Stephen Foster Online

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In Along Came Dylan , Stephen Foster picks up where Walking Ollie left off Instead of one difficult dog, he s got two Where Ollie sees a threat, Dylan sees a challenge and Foster finds himself forever somewhere in the middle, trying to work out why they can t just all be friends....

Title : Along Came Dylan: Two'S a Crowd When You'Ve Been Top Dog
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 1906021414
ISBN13 : 978-1906021412
Format Type : Other Book
Language : Englisch
Publisher : Short Books Ltd 2 Oktober 2008
Number of Pages : 264 Seiten
File Size : 780 KB
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Along Came Dylan: Two'S a Crowd When You'Ve Been Top Dog Reviews

  • Peter Durward Harris
    2019-03-14 05:08

    Following his success with Walking Ollie (though the book appears to have been much more successful than the actual walking), the author eventually decided to acquire another dog. He says this was so that Ollie could have company, though I suspect that financial motives may have been a factor. Of course, keeping a dog is expensive and keeping two much more so, but he could be reasonably sure that a follow-up book about the second dog would repay the costs with interest.As things turned out, Ollie only accepted Dylan reluctantly and never (at least during the first two years of Dylan's life, which is the period covered by this book) regarded him as a friend. Dylan seems to be much more of a bounder, with far more energy to burn than Ollie ever wanted to use. The book, every bit as funny as its predecessor, tells the story of the author's life with Dylan and Ollie, recounting some of Dylan's many escapades, not just with each other but with other dogs.Among the characters that the author and his dogs meet along the way are Philip the inveterate gambler and Diddley, his Dalmatian. The author is also a horse-racing fan so the adults get along very well, while Diddley is about the same age as Dylan so they are friends too. Nevertheless, whenever such quirky characters get together, you can be sure that trouble is never far away, however well they all get on. I'm glad for Philip's sake that Denman beat Kauto Star in the 2008 Cheltenham Gold Cup; it seems like he bet far more money on the horse than he could really afford.Anybody who hasn't ever owned a dog and is contemplating the idea might be put off the idea by reading either this book or Walking Ollie. Actually, I suspect that the author was asking for trouble by choosing the dogs that he did. While all dogs demand a lot of attention (and that's the reason I've never had one), some breeds are more demanding than others. Lurchers and Salukis may not be the best dogs for beginners to acquire. Then again, would the author have had such great material for his book if he'd chosen a less demanding breed? Maybe, or maybe not.This book, along with its predecessor, is a great book for any dog lover to read even if, like me, you don't actually own one.

  • Peter Durward Harris
    2019-02-18 05:07

    Following his success with  (though the book appears to have been much more successful than the actual walking), the author eventually decided to acquire another dog. He says this was so that Ollie could have company, though I suspect that financial motives may have been a factor. Of course, keeping a dog is expensive and keeping two much more so, but he could be reasonably sure that a follow-up book about the second dog would repay the costs with interest.As things turned out, Ollie only accepted Dylan reluctantly and never (at least during the first two years of Dylan's life, which is the period covered by this book) regarded him as a friend. Dylan seems to be much more of a bounder, with far more energy to burn than Ollie ever wanted to use. The book, every bit as funny as its predecessor, tells the story of the author's life with Dylan and Ollie, recounting some of Dylan's many escapades, not just with each other but with other dogs.Among the characters that the author and his dogs meet along the way are Philip the inveterate gambler and Diddley, his Dalmatian. The author is also a horse-racing fan so the adults get along very well, while Diddley is about the same age as Dylan so they are friends too. Nevertheless, whenever such quirky characters get together, you can be sure that trouble is never far away, however well they all get on. I'm glad for Philip's sake that Denman beat Kauto Star in the 2008 Cheltenham Gold Cup; it seems like he bet far more money on the horse than he could really afford.Anybody who hasn't ever owned a dog and is contemplating the idea might be put off the idea by reading either this book or Walking Ollie. Actually, I suspect that the author was asking for trouble by choosing the dogs that he did. While all dogs demand a lot of attention (and that's the reason I've never had one), some breeds are more demanding than others. Lurchers and Salukis may not be the best dogs for beginners to acquire. Then again, would the author have had such great material for his book if he'd chosen a less demanding breed? Maybe, or maybe not.This book, along with , is a great book for any dog lover to read even if, like me, you don't actually own one.NOTE - the book is listed here without an ISBN. It is ISBN-10: 1906021414, ISBN-13: 978-1906021412.